Retriever training is often a paradigm issue.
 

A paradigm is our perception of reality. It can be an interpretation of “how to do things” based on previous teaching received. A paradigm shift can be a fundamental change in an individual's view of how things work.

Inefficient and/or poor performance is the result of “twenty cent thinking”. Translated this means the “two dimes” worth of training experience are not enough. Improvement will not become a reality until there is a significant paradigm shift. Admitting to being narrow minded is the beginning. The “fix” is to somehow create meaningful distance between your “two dimes”. The expression "stuck in a rut" comes to mind. 

Before modifications are possible the present must be more clearly defined. It is a challenge to look at one's self in the mirror with the intent of becoming more aware. The reflection is not often understood or accepted and being closed minded inhibits the process. In some ways, “twenty cent” thinking is safer because it is easier to remain in a comfort zone.

Metamorphosis involves risks. The focus to change by altering the
status quo by doing things differently is at times uncomfortable and often laced with doubt. In essence, the single most important driving force behind this approach is to have an improved trainer and a dog rise above the old.  

The process of making a paradigm shift begins by accepting the simple realization that working harder and doing “more of the same” (which is not acceptable) is simply a mistake. Feeling out of balance in the process of shifting tactics is normal. Embrace it and remain consistently persistent. 

 
                  
                                               Change - Becoming a Different Person (link) 
 
        
                                This is what I keep reminding myself of when working with Pounce.
 
             
                              note: The Training Paradigm is a modification of an essay written
                                       several years ago. Reviewing old files, it "rang a bell".